7 things investors should learn from Ganesha…

investment journey

Lord Ganesha is known by many names, denoting his mighty virtues, and is worshipped across the length and breadth of the country. Every part of his body is symbolic of something good or auspicious and contains a message that can be of immense use in our daily lives. Let us see how we can adopt these messages and adapt them to make our investment journey more fruitful.

Elephant Head (Symbol – Wisdom)

Elephants are wise animals with remarkable long-term memories. The large head of Lord Ganesha denotes wisdom, foresight and intelligence. Let us try to emulate him and think wisely and clearly before investing and consider the long term impact of our investment decisions. Further, we should not get carried away by so called “tips” in the market as we could burn our fingers executing them. Instead, let’s use our intelligence to understand what to buy and what to avoid.

Small Eyes (Symbol – Concentration)

The small eyes of Lord Ganesha denote concentration and razor-sharp focus. What we should learn is to look for details while investing. Observe and analyze minutely the pros and cons of any investment product before investing. We should understand the risks involved in various products and then invest.

Large Ears (Symbol – Listen More)

The large wide ears of Lord Ganesha symbolize his ability to listen attentively and filter out unnecessary news. While investing one should be open to the flow of information available, but should be able to filter out noises and take in knowledge that will help one to make better financial decisions. His large ears also suggest that one has to be a patient listener to make intelligent decisions. You learn more by listening than by talking.

Broken Tusks (Symbol – retain the good and throw away the bad)

The broken tusk of Lord Ganesha implies that nothing is perfect. Its tusk teaches us that we should manage to make the most of whatever is available rather than crying about what is lost. In investing too, some bad investment decisions can affect the entire portfolio.  Most investors sell their winners and hold on to the losers as they do not want to book a loss. However, if something is not good, one must cut the losses and move on.

Small Mouth (Symbol – Talk Less)

His small mouth denotes that one should talk less and speak only when the situation demands. One should refrain from discussing their finances with everyone and discuss only with their family members or their financial advisor. We tend to brag about our profits and hide our losses. It is best to talk less and refrain from gossip.

Large Stomach (Symbol – Digest everything, good and bad)

The large stomach of Lord Ganesha signifies his ability to digest the good and bad things in life. One should always focus on the wider picture and accept the ups and downs of the market while staying invested. It teaches us to be patient and to stomach all the good and bad experience while investing. There will be instances where we will make profits and in some cases we will make losses too. Accept the fact. The whole portfolio will not make money for you. So be content as long as your overall net position shows a profit.

Four Hands (Symbol – Reward & Punishment)

One hand of Lord Ganesha wields an axe, which is meant to cut off all bonds and attachment. In investing too, we should not be emotionally attached to our investments because of their past performance. Emotional detachment from our investments helps us to take better decisions. It is therefore at times good to invest through a mutual fund as the fund manager will have to always take rational decisions. Humans are prone to be emotional.

His second hand has a rope, which is meant to pull you nearer to the highest goal. In investment too we should always try to focus on our long term goal. We must always opt for opportunities which will help our long term goal rather than getting distracted by some short term unsafe investments. There are times when the rope will go down and at times it will be useful to pull us up. Markets will have volatility.

The third hand has a modak, implying that all efforts are directed towards achieving rewards (the modak or financial freedom) and one should always keep an eye on them. Be focused on your goals and with the ups and down, we are sure that you will find nectar in the end.

The fourth hand of lord Ganesha is portrayed as giving a blessing. When all your investment decisions are mobilized towards a supreme goal, you will definitely feel blessed that you have created a portfolio that will help you achieve financial freedom.

Conclusion:

Lord Ganesha is known as Vighnaharta, the remover of obstacles. Accordingly, before beginning anything auspicious, he is the first to be worshipped. As we celebrate His festival let’s try to adopt some of Lord Ganesha’s qualities to become more successful investors.

Disclaimer: The blog is for information purposes only and anything mentioned herein shouldn’t be construed as a fundamental reason to buy/hold/sell any stock. Furthermore, the information provided in the blog and observations made therefrom shouldn’t be treated as the extension of recommendations made on the other properties of Ventura Securities. We strongly suggest you to consult your financial advisor before taking any decision pertaining to your finances. Asset allocation becomes extremely relevant.

We, Ventura Securities Ltd, (SEBI Registration Number INH000001634) its Analysts & Associates with regard to blog article hereby solemnly declare & disclose that:

We do not have any financial interest of any nature in the company. We do not individually or collectively hold 1% or more of the securities of the company. We do not have any other material conflict of interest in the company. We do not act as a market maker in securities of the company. We do not have any directorships or other material relationships with the company. We do not have any personal interests in the securities of the company. We do not have any past significant relationships with the company such as Investment Banking or other advisory assignments or intermediary relationships. We are not responsible for the risk associated with the investment/disinvestment decision made on the basis of this blog article.

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